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A Day in the Life Part 5: Shelter from the Storm

A Day in the Life Part 5: Shelter from the Storm

The cool breeze that began blowing across your back a few minutes ago has a scent to it.  It’s the humid, damp scent of wet earth.  Though the incoming storm clouds haven’t quite yet blocked the late day sun, that event is quickly approaching.  With a sigh you heave out of the hammock and walk to your pack, still perched against the tree.

In the bottom of your pack, you dig around until the thin nylon bag that contains your tarp is felt.  Weaving it around the various loose items, you slide out the bag and quickly head to your hammock.  Unwittingly, you’ve left your stakes in the bottom of your pack, but you don’t realize it just yet.  Opening the drawstring, your tarp slides out easily, and falls to the ground.  Being almost asleep when you noticed the towering clouds, your mind is in a slight panic state, and for some reason, your tarp landing on the ground gives you just enough pause to stop and clearly think.

There isn’t much time to waste.

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A Day in the Life Part 4: Home-making

A Day in the Life Part 4: Home-making

As you gaze around from inside the grove of Red Spruce that will be your home for the night, visions start dancing in your head of sitting by the campfire silently.  At this point, you’re slightly conflicted.  Your feet are tired from the hike, and your hammock only takes five minutes to set up.  On the other hand, it’s much easier to gather firewood before you sit down to take a load off, because you know you won’t want to get back up for a while.

Walking over to the two trees that will be your foundation, you drop your pack and unclasp the top pouch.  Shoving your hand into the nylon bird’s nest inside, you feel around and find your folding saw.  Your decision has been made.  Firewood gathering will come first.  After a large swig of water, you wander over towards the thicker trees, secretly hoping you will come across a full cord of seasoned, split hickory that a good Samaritan has left.  A quality fire is all about preparation, so you’ve resolved yourself to 45 minutes of gathering.

Behind a few rhododendrons, you spot a tall maple tree peeking out.  Here’s hoping it’s dropped a few branches.